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Welcome to the new Tulane School of Professional Advancement.

Our name has changed from the School of Continuing Studies but our mission has stayed the same.

Course Descriptions - Applied Business Studies

Accounting

BSAC 1110 Elementary Accounting I
An introduction to the principles of accounting. Topics include: recognition of revenue and expenses for income determination, proper classification of balance sheet items, and income statement and balance sheet preparation. Students learn to prepare adjusting entries, closing entries and worksheet presentations necessary for monthly financial statements. The principle and theories behind the proper accounting treatment of cash, accounts receivable, inventories, prepaid expenses, marketable securities and fixed assets are studied.
credit hours: 3

BSAC 1120 Elementary Accounting II
Continuation of the study of financial accounting with a detailed study of liabilities and ownership interests for partnerships and corporations. Introduction to statements of changes in financial position, consolidated statements, cost accounting, and the effect of taxes on business decisions.
Pre-requistites: BASC 1110 or equivalent.
credit hours: 3

BSAC 2200 Special Topics in Accounting
credit hours: 3

BSAC 2210 Intermediate Accounting I
Review and extension of the complete accounting process, financial statement preparation and accounting for assets. Study and application of accounting theory to problems of classification and valuation in preparation of the balance sheet and income statement. 
Pre-requistites: BSAC 1120 or equivalent.
credit hours: 3

BSAC 2220 Intermediate Accounting II
Continuation of the study and application of accounting theory to the balance sheet and income statement, including accounting for liabilities and corporate ownership interests, and the flow of funds. Contemporary accounting development and problems.  
Pre-requistites: BSAC 1120 or equivalent.
credit hours: 3

BSAC 3310 Cost Accounting
A study of the accounting methods and procedures peculiar to manufacturing activities. Emphasis is placed on product costing in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles under various costing methods. 
Pre-requistites: BSAC 1120 or equivalent.
credit hours: 3

BSAC 3410 Income Tax
A basic study in federal income tax concepts with emphasis on individual taxation, especially as it relates to income, capital gains, exemptions, credits, and deductions.
Pre-requistites: BASC 1120 or equivalent (intermediate accounting recommended). 
credit hours: 3

BSAC 3420 Corporate Tax
Continuation of the basic study of federal income tax with emphasis on partnerships, trusts, corporations, and estates.
Pre-requistites: BASC 1120 or equivalent.
credit hours: 3

BSAC 4510 Auditing
This course involves the study of the principles of auditing at an intermediate level. Theoretical as well as practical applications are reviewed. These applications are studied at great length in each area of audit responsibility, i.e., requirements for each balance sheet classification and analysis and tests of revenue and expense classifications. Statistical sampling techniques are reviewed. Case studies supplement the lectures, and students create standard and tailored audit programs. 
Pre-requistites: BSAC 2210 or 2220 or equivalent. 
credit hours: 3

BSAC 5620 Advanced Accounting
Special accounting problems in the area of partnerships, installment and consignment sales, mergers, consolidations, translation of financial statements of foreign affiliates, and accounting for estates, trusts and governmental units. 
Pre-requistites: BSAC 2210 or 2220 or equivalent.
credit hours: 3

Business Law

BSBL 2200 Special Topics in Business Law
credit hours: 3

BSBL 3400 Legal Aspects of Business
A practical approach to law as it affects the business person and the consumer. The primary focus is on the laws of contracts; the requirements and the rights and obligations they create. The relief granted to debtors through bankruptcy and the resulting detriment to creditors are studied with emphasis on precautionary measures. Finally, the consequences of willful or negligent acts are carefully treated.
credit hours: 3

BSBL 3450 Commercial Law
This course is designed to show students the connection between law and business; give students basic knowledge of the fundamental concepts, principles, and rules of law that apply to business transactions, especially in the areas covered by the La. CPA examination; and to develop the ability to apply this knowledge to specific situations with good judgment.
credit hours: 3

 

Economics

CSEC 1000 Economics for Non Majors
This course covers the basic concepts and analytical techniques used in both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Topics include: consumer choice; firm profit maximization; product, labor, capital, and financial markets; the short-run and long run macroeconomic models; aggregate demand and supply; and the determinants of macroeconomic policy.
Notes: Only School of Professional Advancement students can receive credit for this course, and students will only receive credit for CSEC 1000 OR CSEC 1010.
credit hours: 3

CSEC 1010 Introductory Microeconomics
Introductory Microeconomics An introduction to theory of prices and the allocation of resources. Topics include the pricing of goods and services, the determination of wages and returns to capital, market structure, and international trade.
Notes: Only School of Professional Advancement students can receive credit for this course, and students will only receive credit or CSEC 1000 or CSEC 1010.
credit hours: 3

 

Finance

BSFN 2200 Special Topics in Finance
credit hours: 3

BSFN 2210 Introduction to Finance
Analysis of business opportunities and problems from the financial manager’s point of view. Special emphasis on determining discounted cash flow, analytical techniques and methods used in structuring the balance sheet. Some accounting desired.
credit hours: 3

BSFN 2540 Introduction to Investment
Fundamental principles of investment and development of the student’s ability to select the various investment securities that meet the investor’s needs. A study of the principles and practices in security analysis and a review of the methods commonly employed in the analysis of financial statements.
credit hours: 3

BSFN 3310 Money and Banking
A non-technical overview of the role of financial institutions in the economic process with emphasis upon the development of commercial banking since 1960. The course is structured to give relatively equal attention to each of the following three general areas: the supply of loanable funds, the demand for loanable funds, and money and capital markets.
credit hours: 3

BSFN 3460 Financial Markets
This course is designed to introduce students to the different types of financial instruments and the markets in which they trade. The instructor will discuss the characteristics of the various products, how they are valued, and how the markets in which they trade differ. The student will study the money markets, the bond markets, the private debt market (bank loans, etc.) and the equities market. If time permits, the course will briefly cover the derivatives markets.
credit hours: 3

BSFN 3540 Intermediate Investments
A continuation of Introduction to Investments (BSFN 2540). This course explores investment topics as they relate to individual investors and professionals. Risk and return principles on securities and portfolios are studied as well as valuation techniques and analysis of fixed income securities, equities, and options. Financial statements, futures markets, portfolio theory, and capital market theory are also covered. The course assumes the student has a basic understanding of investment vehicles and their characteristics.
Pre-requistites: BSFN 2540 or instructor approval.
credit hours: 3

BSFN 3560 Personal Financial Planning
While laws and values continue to change, the abilities to analyze, evaluate and make decisions remain central to building financial security. The course develops these abilities and considers the skills to look for in selecting competent bankers, brokers, accountants, insurance and real estate professionals.
credit hours: 3

 

Human Resource Development

HRDV 2200 Special Topics in Human Resource Development
credit hours: 3

HRDV 3000 Learning and Training in Organizations
An overview of human resources training and development, including needs assessment, training design, implementation and evaluation. This course will integrate applied principles of adult learning. Various methods and training media will be explored.
credit hours: 3

HRDV 3330 Human Resources
This class is an introduction to organizational, legal, and psychological frameworks governing modern Human Resources Administration. This course provides an overview of the Human Resources function and the Human Resources department's role in furthering both employee and organizational goals.
credit hours: 3

HRDV 3420 Managing Troubled Employees: Sex, Drugs and Violence
This course will prepare the student to understand, identify and manage the troubled employee on a macro and micro basis. The student will learn to develop effective policies and procedures to address the causes and concerns of troubled employees. The student will become familiar with the legal and ethical issues surrounding troubled employees. This course covers workplace trends, sexual equality, sexual harassment, discrimination, life/work balancing, stress, mental illness, drug and alcohol abuse, workplace violence, post-traumatic stress intervention and employee assistance programs.
Pre-requistites: HRDV 3330.  Instructor approval required for waiver of prerequisite. 
credit hours: 3

HRDV 3450 Professional Interviewing
This course teaches the art of interviewing individuals in various situations. Potential interviewees will include victims, witnesses, suspects, job applicants and children. Emphasis will be placed on interviewing process with the intent to reveal deceit, expose untruthfulness and corroborate truthfulness. The interviewing process will be learned from the beginning stages whereby the interviewer determines the objectives of the interview and establishes a rapport with the interviewee. When necessary and warranted, techniques for inducing stress and discomfort will be explored and potential responses to stress will be discussed. 
credit hours: 3

HRDV 3520 Compensation and Benefits
This is a comprehensive analysis of the purpose, structure and effectiveness of compensation systems. Topics include legal issues, job design, job analysis, job evaluation, pay systems, incentives, psychological and motivational aspects of pay, executive compensation and compensation plan administration. Benefits are addressed at a basic level.
credit hours: 3

HRDV 3530 Benefits Administration
This course addresses issues regarding mandatory benefits such as social security and workers compensation and voluntary benefits such as medical and life insurance. Cost containment and the changing legal environment regarding benefits are covered. 
Pre-requistites: HRDV 3520 and its prerequisite. Instructor approval required for waiver of prerequisites. 
credit hours: 3

HRDV 3650 Planning, Recruitment, and Selection of Human Resources
This course addresses the strategic, legal and administrative issues associated with recruitment and selection of employees, including assessment of staffing needs. The psychological aspects of Human Resources flow systems are emphasized. Career issues are examined from the point of view of the employee and the organization. The coordination of Human Resources planning and organizational competitive strategy is covered. 
Pre-requistites: HRDV 3330.  Instructor approval required for waiver of prerequisite. 
credit hours: 3

HRDV 3700 Performance Appraisal and Productivity
This course includes developing and implementing performance appraisal systems appropriate for the organization's competitive strategy. Students are introduced to productivity-enhancing work designs such as Total Quality Management, teams, empowerment, and Business Process Reengineering.
Pre-requistites: HRDV 3330. Instructor approval required for waiver of prerequisite. 
credit hours: 3

HRDV 3820 Human Resources Information Systems
Human Resource functions are rapidly being computerized. This course will cover computer applications in Human Resources including applicant tracking, payroll and benefits administration, employee data bases, and other applications. Basic HR research and program evaluation will be introduced.
Pre-requistites: HRDV 3330.  Instructor approval required for waiver of prerequisite. 
credit hours: 3

HRDV 3920 Employment and Labor Law
The Federal laws surrounding employment and their impact on Human Resource policies and practices are addressed in this class. These include the Equal Employment Opportunity Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, Americans with Disabilities Act, Occupational Safety and Health Act, the National Labor Relations Act, and many others.
Pre-requistites: HRDV 3330. Instructor approval required for waiver of prerequisite.
credit hours: 3

HRDV 3930 Industrial Relations
This course covers the fundamentals of Industrial Relations in the United States. It addresses the historical roots of the labor movement and its social and economic underpinnings. The major Federal laws governing the relationship between unions and employers are covered. The issues of union organizing, contract negotiations, impasses and strikes, contract administration and grievance systems are discussed. The key differences between unions in the public and the private sector are addressed. The trends in Industrial Relations are addressed, including labor-management cooperation, the decline of U.S. unions and the impact of globalization on U.S. unions. Union avoidance through good Human Resource practices is discussed. 
credit hours: 3

 

Management

BSMT 2200 Special Topics in Management
credit hours: 3

BSMT 2250 Business Communications
This course focuses on the three main areas for learning: The theoretical - a brief background and sources of communication theory. The practical tools of communication theory as they apply to the world of work. The experiential putting the tools to work in both a classroom setting and in a real world" business setting."
credit hours: 3

BSMT 2310 Principles of Management
Analysis of the basic management process such as planning, organization, coordination and control. Survey of the various schools of management thought with emphasis on the process, human behavior and quantitative schools of management. No prerequisites are required. 
credit hours: 3

BSMT 2750 Introduction to Franchising
This course will examine franchising as a business form. During the semester, students will study franchising from the perspective of both the franchisor and the franchisee covering all relevant issues, including franchising agreements and related documents, financing, site selection, marketing, financial management and operations. the course will examine the franchisee/franchisor relationship, contractual requirements, trademarks, territorial rights, compliance issues, legal considerations and current issues in franchising. 
credit hours: 3

BSMT 3250 Business Statistics
A survey of some of the more important concepts and techniques of statistics. Illustrations are drawn from the business world; in particular, time series analysis and index numbers are introduced. Students are brought in contact with computer implementation of statistical procedures. It is recommended that the student have a background in high school algebra. Meets math proficiency requirement for Bachelor of Arts degree only. 
credit hours: 3

BSMT 3340 Managing Organizational Behavior
This course is an introduction to how organizations function. The student will develop abilities to diagnose and respond more flexibly in organizations they participate in and explore and reflect critically on key themes in modern organizations. Major emphasis is placed on teams, globalization and diversity, interpersonal and group communication, organizational cultures and negotiating the fit between the individual and the organization. 
credit hours: 3

BSMT 3380 Business Ethics
A theoretical critique and case oriented analysis of the moral, ethical, and value issues that challenge business, industry, and corporate life with a view toward discovering ethical principles and strategies applicable to the management process. Also, in response to the recent barrage of charges of breaches of ethical conduct by business leaders (WorldCom, Enron, Arthur Anderson, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, ImClone, Tyco, etc.), one module of the course will be devoted to the exploration of your personal business ethics code of conduct. 
credit hours: 3

BSMT 3600 Entrepreneurship
This course gives a brief historical survey of entrepreneurship, discusses the personality traits common to many entrepreneurs, explores ways to analyze new venture opportunities from marketing, production, and organizational perspectives; and reviews the legal considerations involved in starting a business and protecting a new venture idea. Special emphasis is placed on solving the problem of financing the new venture. 
Pre-requistites: BSFN 2210 and BSMK 3200 or approval of instructor. 
credit hours: 3

BSMT 3650 Developing a Small Business
This course is designed to introduce students to the essentials of small business start-up and management. This course will teach students how to locate and to analyze opportunity, set up the operating structure, develop marketing and financial plans, and utilize financial reports for effective management of a developing small business.
credit hours: 3

BSMT 3700 Global Business
This course examines the strategies, benefits, costs, ethical practices, and conduct of businessmen, government leaders, workers, and customers in the global marketplace. The course also examines the economic, legal, and cultural impact of global business on local and national communities. The course literature, both text and selected readings, provides the foundation of the course. A portion of the course material involves current business and political events, adding context to the issues raised in the literature.  
credit hours: 3

BSMT 3750 Business Internships
This course is designed to help students prepare for a career in business through both education and experience. Students will be required to spend 75 hours working in a business office. The internship will be secured by the student with assistance from the professor. In addition to the 75 hour requirement, students will attend all class meetings scheduled. These class meetings are for the student's benefit and designed to enhance their professional work experience. 
Notes: The Business Internship class should be taken during your last year of study for the Associate's Degree.
credit hours: 3

 

Marketing

BSMK 2200 Special Topics in Marketing
credit hours: 1-3

BSMK 3200 Introduction to Marketing Principles
A study of our present-day marketing system from a managerial point of view. Subjects covered include products, consumers, promotion, channels of distribution, market research, pricing, marketing, feasibility analysis, marketing law and international marketing. The majority of class time is spent in lecture and discussing solutions to marketing cases by the application of marketing principles. An out-of-class project is required in which student groups observe actual business operations of their choice and analyze particular problems that these businesses are encountering. 
credit hours: 3

BSMK 3300 Consumer Behavior
Understanding the consumer is the key to developing and implementing successful marketing strategies. Disciplines such as psychology, sociology, and anthropology provide insight into the factors that influence the decision to buy. These factors are used to identify market segments and to explain their buying habits and mental processes.
credit hours: 3

BSMK 3400 Principles of Advertising
This course covers the fundamentals of advertising, beginning with the history and evolution of advertising as an element in the economy, a specialized form of communication, a craft, and an area of ethical sensitivity. At the practical level, students will be introduced to media planning and the emergence of new media, market research, agency organization and creativity as well as the legal and ethical concerns that advertising professionals must bear in mind. 
credit hours: 3

BSMK 3410 Advertising II
This course requires the students to put together projects and advertising campaigns that should enhance their understanding of advertising and give them meaningful projects for their portfolio. 
credit hours: 3

BSMK 4100 Marketing Research Design
This course focuses on the fundamental techniques and skills of marketing research today, including research and survey design, data collection methods, behavioral science techniques, computer programs and techniques for statistical analysis, and marketing applications for new product development and testing, sales forecasting, and advertising for retail, industrial and international markets.
credit hours: 3

 

Real Estate

REAL 2200 Special Topics in Real Estate
credit hours: 3

REAL 2320 Principles and Practices of Real Estate
This course discusses the real estate business, market, ownership and interests, contracts, land surveying, property description, title transfers, closings, financing, mortgage market, liens, taxes, assessments, brokerage, appraisal, leases and property insurance. Experts in special fields contribute to lectures and discussions.
credit hours: 3

REAL 2450 Introduction to Urban Planning
An examination of the rules and regulations governing land use controls and how these must be taken into consideration throughout design and construction phases. The student will come to understand the necessity for such regulations and the importance of conforming to them. 
credit hours: 3

REAL 3320 Advanced Real Estate Principles
This course presents the principles of Real Estate that are necessary for effective decision making in the marketing of real estate, purchasing of real estate, and buy-hold-sell situations. The student will study factors of supply and demand, financing options, investment analysis, and the development process use in decision making by real estate developers. (Discounted Cash Flows) The Louisiana Real Estate Commission has approved this course for 45 hours towards resident and general appraisal certification.
credit hours: 3

REAL 3340 Real Estate Law
Legal aspects of real estate, including sales, mortgages, leases, servitudes, successions, wills, closing costs and procedures, judgments, liens, surveys, purchase contracts, condominiums and townhouses.
credit hours: 3

REAL 3350 Real Estate Appraisal I
This introductory course emphasizes appraisal principles and procedures. Special topics include the new appraisal law, changes in current appraisal standards of professional practice, and report writing techniques. A field inspection and the preparation of a factual demonstration report is part of the course.
credit hours: 3

REAL 3360 Real Estate Appraisal II
This course is a continuation of Real Estate Appraisal I and an introduction to appraising income-producing property. The emphasis is on the development of income and expense statements and the use of capitalization techniques. This course also includes a seminar on the uses of computers in appraising real estate.
credit hours: 3

REAL 3400 Real Estate Brokerage
This course is designed to give an overview of general real estate brokerage. It includes the broker and the license law, the real estate commission, the specialist and the generalist in brokerage, when and how to expand, sales personnel, recruiting, training and supervision, administration of the brokerage operation, and other topics pertaining to the day-to-day brokerage business.
credit hours: 3

REAL 3510 Real Estate Finance
An introduction to residential, multi-family, and commercial financing. The course covers government guaranteed loans, conventional loans, and innovative financing. Guest speakers are brought in to lecture on construction loans, appraisals, title insurance, private mortgage insurance and legal aspects of the mortgage.
credit hours: 3

REAL 3600 Current Issues in Real Estate
This course will be taught as a seminar. Topics include: creative financing, advanced investment structuring, time sharing, property insurance, transferring title-recordation, taxes and assessments, real estate appraisal, condominiums, leasing real estate, syndication exchange, and historic preservation. There may be changes in these subject areas as the interest and accent change from year to year.
credit hours: 3